Archive for January 2012

Behind the Scenes at Superbowl XLVIII   Leave a comment

 

Behind the Scenes at Superbowl XLVIII

 
 

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All sign kiosks at the MetLIfe Stadium (over one hundred) recently displayed the DENNIS KOWAL ARCHITECTS logo.

 
 

DENNIS KOWAL ARCHITECTS is proud to have provided a full scholarship for a young man to go to the NFL training camp.  He is a line-backer hopeful and quite an accomplished student at the same time having just received his Masters degree in Criminal Justice.   DKA routinely helps young students navigate their way with a mix of strategies from providing paid internships to career counseling.  But this is not the only connection DKA has to football.  DKA designed a new football stadium for the College of New Jersey (see below) and recently sponsored an event at MetLife Stadium; home of Superbowl XLVIII.

 
 
 
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Facility Mangers from around the tri-state area convened in the famous Giants-Jets Coaches Club under a virtual digital banner of DKA logos and photos of the office’s work.  DKA was an official sponsor of the night and the large television monitors displayed their name.

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The secret and locked slow motion replay studio feeds the referees the plays under review.  It is connected by miles of cable trays and adjacent to an on-site State Police station.  The DKA logo even showed on one of the official re-play monitors.

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The famous tunnel connects the playing field with the Locker Rooms under the stadium.  The artificial turf has underfield drainage and can be quickly pulled up in sections;  all logos and team names are easily switched between the Jets and the Giants.  Poor compaction during construction required some of the deeply buried drainage piping to be re-excavated  and reset.  All of the turf was replaced for Superbowl XLVIII.

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The MetLIfe Stadium has full emergency services including x-ray and emergency power.  DKA in association with AJP designed the new football stadium for The College of New Jersey including the impressive floating pier Press/VIP Suites and Team Concession Stands.

DENNIS KOWAL ARCHITECTS researched the design for the College of New Jersey Football stadium by visiting stadiums in New Jersey and Philadelphia.  Sport fans can become animated.   Special designs for the public restrooms included prevention measures similar to prison design that could prevent angry fans from destroying property.     The stands were reinforced to prevent dynamic sway and the Press Box floats on concrete piers to limit unauthorized access.

 
 

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Visitors to the MetLIfe Stadium are greeted by multiple sign kiosks displaying the DKA logo. 

DKA designs visually pleasing yet functional sport complexes

 
 

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Posted January 31, 2012 by Dennis Kowal Architects in Interns

I was the one who closed all the traffic lanes   1 comment

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I was the one who closed all the traffic lanes!

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DKA provided an actual traffic study for the State of New Jersey in which the act of studying traffic, backed up the traffic!

 

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All will remember when the NJ Governor’s chief of staff got in hot water for closing the George Washington Bridge lanes for a “traffic study”.   Well, I was the one who wrote the original traffic study that made everyone upset.  It was several years ago, when new emission testing regulations threatened the capacity of the existing New Jersey Motor Vehicle Inspection Stations.  As an Architect, I was hired by the Governor’s Office to study all of  the existing NJDMV Inspection Stations in 21 counties to determine how many new lanes needed to be built.  It was a $100,000 study  that looked at the vehicle inspection process from tip-over problems with  SUV’s to more stringent emission laws.   It also examined statistics and average inspections per worker.   By the way, the best time to get your car inspected is the middle of the morning, in the middle of the week in the middle of the month…..no lines at the most locations.

In order to test some theories, I commandeered a popular motor vehicle inspection station and crew and we tested our “dual lane vehicle theory”.   In essence, we discovered that adding lanes alongside an existing station was expensive and sometimes impractical due to land restrictions, but increasing the thru-put of existing lanes increased capacity without any construction.   The concept was that the  length of the existing lanes were underutilized; actually two cars could go through the test locations in the same time frame as one vehicle if sent in as a pair.  So we added equipment and inspectors to an existing lane and put up cones to build up enough traffic to put the dual-lane vehicle theory to the test.  It took a while for everyone to get the hang of it, but it worked.  With virtually no major construction, we doubled the capacity of the existing inspection stations by taking two cars through the process with duplicate inspections at the same time.   But then it happened….

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Angry motorist’s didn’t like being part of a study and demanded we stop the testing even though the theory actually began to work quite well.  It seems lane closures are never popular!

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In setting up the test facility and cones, we created some long lines outside the facility.   Unhappy customers waiting in line got quite vocal.   They saw the clip boards, stop watches and  commotion and demanded we stop the study.      So what happened to the theory?   Like the Indiana Jones movie, the study is buried in some warehouse somewhere and the State decided to build more lanes!  Your tax dollars at work!

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inseState auto inspection station, New Jersey, USA

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Some ideas are just ahead of their time and so the State built  more lanes rather than improve the capacity of what they had.  Using existing resources to better purpose and efficiency is a hallmark of sustainable design and Dennis Kowal Architects.

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DENNIS KOWAL ARCHITECTS  studies the problems and recommends the most efficient solutions.

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Posted January 10, 2012 by Dennis Kowal Architects in Master Planning